A retainer is an amount of money paid in advance to secure the services of an attorney. The retainer is held in a trust account on behalf of the client. The attorney’s hourly rate is billed against the retainer amount. What that means is that every time work is performed on a client’s file the hourly rate is deducted from the retainer paid.

You can think of the trust account as a bucket. You can think of the retainer payment as rocks placed in the bucket. Every time work is performed on a client’s case a rock is taken out of the bucket. When the number of rocks gets below a certain amount, the client has to give the attorney more rocks to add.

Here is a numeric example, your retainer is $3,250. That $3,250 is placed in your assigned bucket. The attorney performs 1 hour of work at a rate of $325 per hour (rocks). Your bucket now has $2,925 in it.

Retainers also include a replenishment provision. What that means is that once your original retainer goes below a  pre-determined amount you must pay additional funds to bring your retainer back up to the predetermined amount.

For example, your replenishment provision could be $1,625. That means that when the attorney has worked on your case and the hours billed adds up to an amount that decreases the number of rocks in your bucket below $1,625, you have to add more rocks to bring it back up to $1,625.

Here is a numeric example, Your original retainer is $3,250. The attorney works 6 hours at a rate of $325 per hour. That deducts $1,950 from your bucket. Your bucket now has $1,300 in it. You will receive a bill for $325 to bring your bucket back up to $1,625.