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FAQ Page2020-09-25T14:56:43+00:00
How long do I have to file for contempt on denied visitation2020-10-09T19:55:27+00:00

The court retains jurisdiction for contempt up to 6 months after the kid is adult or up to 6 months after the right to possession terminates.

How long do I have to file for contempt on over due child support2020-10-09T19:49:26+00:00

The court retains jurisdiction for contempt up to 2 years after the child becomes an adult or  2 years after the child support obligation terminates.

What Is A Retainer?2021-07-15T14:06:00+00:00

A retainer is an amount of money paid in advance to secure the services of an attorney. The retainer is held in a trust account on behalf of the client. The attorney’s hourly rate is billed against the retainer amount. What that means is that every time work is performed on a client’s file the hourly rate is deducted from the retainer paid.

You can think of the trust account as a bucket. You can think of the retainer payment as rocks placed in the bucket. Every time work is performed on a client’s case a rock is taken out of the bucket. When the number of rocks gets below a certain amount, the client has to give the attorney more rocks to add.

Here is a numeric example, your retainer is $3,250. That $3,250 is placed in your assigned bucket. The attorney performs 1 hour of work at a rate of $325 per hour (rocks). Your bucket now has $2,925 in it.

Retainers also include a replenishment provision. What that means is that once your original retainer goes below a  pre-determined amount you must pay additional funds to bring your retainer back up to the predetermined amount.

For example, your replenishment provision could be $1,625. That means that when the attorney has worked on your case and the hours billed adds up to an amount that decreases the number of rocks in your bucket below $1,625, you have to add more rocks to bring it back up to $1,625.

Here is a numeric example, Your original retainer is $3,250. The attorney works 6 hours at a rate of $325 per hour. That deducts $1,950 from your bucket. Your bucket now has $1,300 in it. You will receive a bill for $325 to bring your bucket back up to $1,625.

How Long Will My Divorce Take?2020-09-19T23:29:05+00:00

There is a minimum 60 day waiting period in Texas to finalize a divorce. However, how long a divorce takes depends on many factors including the issues involved in the divorce and the court’s availability to schedule hearings for contested issues.

What Are The Grounds For Divorce In Texas?2020-09-19T23:29:38+00:00

There are two types of divorce in Texas: Fault and No-Fault.

Most divorces in Texas are no-fault. It is the least expensive.

There are 5 basic categories of fault divorce in the Texas Family Code. Fault can be important for the purpose of marital property division, parental rights, and spousal maintenance.

The 5 fault categories are:

  • Cruelty
  • Adultery
  • Criminal Felony Conviction
  • Abandonment
  • Confinement in mental hospital for an extended period of time
Who Can Get Divorced In Texas?2020-09-19T23:30:07+00:00

To file a divorce in Texas at least one spouse must have lived in Texas for 6 months and in the county where the divorce will be filed for at least 90 days prior to the filing of the divorce.

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