As the owner of The Blacknall Firm, a Dallas divorce attorney, I often get asked about the concept of separate property and how it is treated in a divorce. In this blog post, I will explain what separate property is, how it is distinguished from community property, and how it is treated in a divorce in Texas.

What is separate property?

First, it is important to understand that Texas is a community property state, which means that any property acquired by either spouse during the marriage is considered community property and is subject to division in a divorce. However, there are some exceptions to this rule, and one of those exceptions is separate property.

Separate property is any property that was acquired by one spouse before the marriage, through inheritance or gift during the marriage, or after the parties have separated. This property is not considered part of the community estate and is therefore not subject to division in a divorce.

How is separate property distinguished from community property?

It is important to note that just because property is separate property does not mean that it is automatically excluded from the divorce. In some cases, separate property can become commingled with community property, which means that it becomes difficult to distinguish between the two. In these cases, a court may need to determine the value of the separate property and then determine how much of the value has been commingled with the community estate.

How is separate property treated in a divorce?

Proving separate property can sometimes be a complex process, but it is important to do so in order to ensure that you receive your fair share of the marital estate in a divorce. If you are going through a divorce and have separate property that you want to protect, it is important to hire an experienced Texas divorce attorney who can help you navigate the process and protect your rights.

As a experienced Texas divorce attorney at The Blacknall Firm, I urge you  to schedule a consultation and discuss how to protect your rights and assets during a divorce.